Pure Physio Blog

Summer Has Arrived, Time To Talk Cricket!

Published on
18 Dec 2015

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The long Saturday and Sundays at the crease or in the field can produce unwanted injuries. Fast bowlers generally are the more frequently injured players, but batsmen, fielders and wicket keepers are all at some risk. Rather than be acute injuries (apart from the old bruise or contusion from some body line bowling!) many injuries overuse problems and gradually build up over the season.

The Australian summer brings out the best bowlers, bludgeoning batsmen and backyard banter. Yes that’s right cricket! The nations favourite pastime! We have already dispatched our neighbors from across the Tasman. Now it’s on to the Windies!

Like the Aussie team most of the local and state level cricketers are in full swing this summer. The long Saturday and Sundays at the crease or in the field can produce unwanted injuries. Fast bowlers generally are the more frequently injured players, but batsmen, fielders and wicket keepers are all at some risk. Rather than be acute injuries (apart from the old bruise or contusion from some body line bowling!) many injuries overuse problems and gradually build up over the season.

Common Complaints

Back Pain

  • Lumbar Spine stress fractures – usually in the younger fast bowler <25 yr, which is aggravated by arching, twisting, standing or high impact activities. Pain may radiate to buttock or thigh, and is usually eased by rest.
  • Lumbar Disc injury – which can be seen more in older players with a history of back pain and/or some degenerative changes. This will be aggravated by bending to field a ball or flexing forward and taking stance at the crease.

Shoulder Pain

  • Cricket involves overhead activities at high intensity and often in a repetitive nature – bowling, throwing etc. this can lead to some painful shoulder presentation.
  • Common issues are shoulder impingement, rotator cuff tears, and even shoulder dislocation.

Things To Look For

  • Large jumps in overall load when bowling, for example 10 overs one week 50 overs the next.
  • Mixed of front on and side on bowling techniques.
  • Exaggerated lumbar lordosis, tight hamstrings, hip flexors or glutes
  • Poor throwing technique, for example using the shoulder joint only and not rotating through the trunk and hips as you throw
  • Tight pecs, and poor range of motion through the thoracic spine.

Recommendations

  • Monitor your loads week to week – training an playing
  • If you are experiencing pain in your back, shoulders or anywhere else get a comprehensive assessment from a physiotherapist
  • Seek advice with your bowling technique from your coach
  • Ensure you have a proper warm up and mobility program as part of your training and game day routine
  • Be sun smart
  • Enjoy!
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